Big Firm Experience...Small Town Values
Personal Injury Attorney Greenville SC
Slide background

workers compensation attorney greenville sc

Workers Compensation

greenville personal injury attorney

Personal Injury

 

social security disability attorney greenville sc

Social Security

Personal Injury Attorney Greenville SC

Venus Poe has practiced law for more than a decade and was the managing personal injury attorney in the Greenville office of a large multi-state law firm where she successfully represented large corporations in the courtroom.

Ms. Poe decided to follow her calling and open her own law firm representing individuals and helping them through sometimes difficult and devastating situations. Ms. Poe personally meets with each new client to understand your case and explain the process and personally checks on each of her clients throughout their recovery.

When it comes to hiring an attorney you have a lot of choices. You may have looked at other attorney’s websites and tried to do your homework. So why should you hire me? I can help you. I deal with the insurance company, your health insurance company and the investigation of your case.

My clients come back to me and refer their friends and family to me because I take the time to personally listen to you, give you honest advice and take care of the details for you so you can concentrate on getting better. For me, being an attorney is not just a job, it is a calling. I am aggressive and work hard in each case so that you get the best results and that you feel confident and referring your friends and family to us in the future.

Car Accident eBook CTA

What's Your Case Worth CTA

Personal Injury, Trucking Accidents, Workers Compensation, Social Security Disability

If  you have been injured or have been denied social security benefits, chances are you are stressed and not sure how to get your life back on track.  Seeking legal representation now allows you to concentrate on your recovery while we take on the stress of dealing with the insurance adjuster and the courts.

Whether you have experienced serious personal injury, a work injury, the wrongful death of a family member in a fatal accident, or require someone to fight for your social security benefits, we are ready to fight for you.  Contact us today to learn how we can help you.

Recent Blog Posts

How Your Age Effects Your Application For Social Security Disability

How Your Age Effects Your Application For Social Security Disability Many people have questions about how their age would affect their application for disability.  Some people have heard that it is harder to get disability the younger you are. This is true. There is a five step process to determine if a Claimant is awarded disability benefits. To prove that you are disabled and entitled to Social Security Disability benefits you must show 1. You are not working. If you are working in 2016 and your earnings average more than $1,130 a month, you generally cannot be considered disabled. 2. Your condition must be “severe.” To be considered “severe” your condition must interfere with basic work-related activities. 3. Does you “severe” condition meet a listing? For each of the major body systems, the Social Security Administration maintains a list of medical conditions that are so severe they automatically mean that you are disabled. For each condition you will normally have to produce medical labs, test or other evidence that is required by the individual listing.  The conditions that meet a listing can be found here https://www.ssa.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/listing-impairments.htm If you meet a listing then you are awarded disability and the analysis stops there. If you do not meet a listing, you must proceed to the fourth part of the Social Security Disability Analysis. 4. Can you do any work that you have done previously? If, given your limitations caused by your severe condition, you can still perform any work that you have done in the past, your claim will be denied.  If you cannot do any work that you have done previously, you must proceed to the Fifth and final part of the Social Security Disability Analysis. 5. Can you do any other work in the national economy? If you cannot do the work you did in the past, the burden of proof shifts to the Social Security Administration to show that their are other jobs in the national economy that you can perform given your limitations. The Social Security Administration  considers your medical conditions, what you are functional capable of doing, your age, education, past work experience and any transferable skills you may have. If there are other jobs that exist in the national economy that you can adjust to, your claim will be denied. If given all those factors, no jobs exist that meet those criteria, you will be found disabled. In these cases, the Social Security Administration will first make a determination on what level of exertion you can perform at in a work environment. The categories are divided from the least level of exertion to most. The category is as follows: Sedentary work. Sedentary work involves lifting no more than 10 pounds at a time and occasionally lifting or carrying articles like docket files, ledgers, and small tools. Although a sedentary job is defined as one which involves sitting, a certain amount of walking and standing is often necessary in carrying out job duties. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met. (b) Light work. Light work involves lifting no more than 20 pounds at a time with frequent      lifting or carrying of objects weighing up to 10 pounds. Even though the weight lifted may be      very little, a job is in this category when it requires a good deal of walking or standing, or       when it involves sitting most of the time with some pushing and pulling of arm or leg           controls. To be considered capable of performing a full or wide range of light work, you must      have the ability to do substantially all of these activities. If someone can do light work, we     determine that he or she can also do sedentary work, unless there are additional limiting    factors such as loss of fine dexterity or inability to sit for long periods of time. (c) Medium work.Medium work involves lifting no more than 50 pounds at a time with frequent      lifting or carrying of objects weighing up to 25 pounds. If someone can do medium work, the      Social Security Administration will determine that he or she can also do sedentary and light      work. (d) Heavy work. Heavy work involves lifting no more than 100 pounds at a time with frequent       lifting or carrying of objects weighing up to 50 pounds. If someone can do heavy work, the      Social Security Administration will determine that he or she can also do medium, light, and      sedentary work. (e) Very heavy work.Very heavy work involves lifting objects weighing more than 100pounds at      a time with frequent lifting or carrying of objects weighing 50 pounds or more. If someone      can do very heavy work, the Social Security Administration will determine that he or she can      also do heavy, medium, light and sedentary work. Once the Social Security Administration has made a conclusion on your level of exertion, they will then correlate it with the GRID chart with your age, education, level, and past work and make their decision whether you are disabled or not. The GRID rules are comprised of age, education, and past work. This is because your physical abilities are not the only factor in determining your disability. Generally, the older and less educated you are the more likely you will be found disabled. The social security office  has specific ages and categories in which they place you according to your age. 18-49 years of age is considered to be a “younger individual”; 50-54 years of age is “approaching advanced age”; and, 55 and older is “advanced age” according to the Social Security Administration and the GRID rules. To view the GRID go to: https://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-app-p02.htm Find which category you fall under listed above by your age. Next consider your education, are you “limited or less”, “high […]

0 comments

Can you get workers’ compensation benefits if you are in a car accident on your way to work?

  Can I get workers compensation if I am in a car accident on my way to work? As a general rule, an employee who is going to or coming from work is generally not considered to be engaged in performing any service growing out of or incidental to employment, and therefore, an injury sustained going to or from work does not generally fall under the Workers’ Compensation Act. This is called the “going and coming rule.” Just like with any rule, there are exceptions. Five exceptions have been recognized in South Carolina. They are: 1. Transportation is provided by the employer Where, in going to and returning from work, the means of transportation is provided by the employer, or the time that is consumed is paid for or included in the wages; 2. The employee is in the process of completing some duty or task of the employer. Where the employee, on his way to or from his work, is still charged with some duty or task in connection with his employment; 3. The way in or out of work is inherently dangerous or maintained by the employer The way used is inherently dangerous and is either (a) the exclusive way of ingress and egress to and from his work; or (b) constructed and maintained by the employer; 4. You are close to your job site If an injury happens in the course of your travel to your place of work and not on the premises of your employer but in close proximity thereto is not compensable unless the place of injury was brought within the scope of employment by an express or implied requirement in the contract of employment of its use by you in going to and coming from your work. This exception in most often applied when someone is hurt in the parking lot of the employer before or after a work shift. 5. While running a errand for the employer during non work hours A fifth exception allows compensation where an employee sustains an injury while performing a special task, service, mission, or errand for his employer, even before or after customary working hours, or on a day on which he does not ordinarily work. Injuries that fall within one of the exceptions to the “goings and comings” rule are typically denied by the workers’ compensation insurance carriers. Often adjusters do not understand these exceptions. Knowing if your accident fits into one of the exceptions to the going and coming rule can be difficult to understand. If you would like to speak with a lawyer regarding the possibility of compensation for your accident under the Workers’ Compensation Act, please call Venus Poe at 864-963-0310. The information you obtain in this article is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should not read this article to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction in which you may have a case.

0 comments

What are the rules to make sure there are no sleepy truck drivers?

<h1>What are the rules to make sure there are no sleepy truck drivers?<h1> Nearly 4000 people are killed each year in tractor-trailer accidents. The federal government established hours of service rules because truck driver fatigue is one of the highest causes of these tractor-trailer accidents in the United States. In a bid to provide the truck drivers with rest and sleep, and to reduce truck accidents due to truck driver fatigue, these laws have been put into effect to limit the number of hours that a truck can be on the road. Truck driver can drive for a maximum of 11 continuous hours, in a 14-hour work day, after which they are required to take a mandatory rest period of 10 hours before getting behind the wheel of their truck again. The 14-consecutive-hour driving window begins when the trucker start any kind of work. Once the trucker have reached the end of this 14-consecutive-hour period, he cannot drive again until he has been off duty for another 10 consecutive hours, or the equivalent of at least 10 consecutive hours off duty. Who must follow these Hours of Service rules? In general it is a truck, or truck-tractor with a trailer, that is involved in interstate commerce and: • Weighs (including any load) 10,001 pounds (4,536 kg) or more, or • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds (4,536 kg) or more, or • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards. We will describe these terms in greater detail in the next sections of this document How are hours documented? Tractor-trailer drivers have been required to keep paper logs of their hours dating back to 1938, but accident investigators and safety advocates have long complained it’s easy to change the logs or keep two different sets of records to evade restrictions on hours. Electronic logging devices automatically record driving time by monitoring engine hours, vehicle movement, miles driven and location information.The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has recently enacted new rules requiring electronic logging of hours. The FMCSA estimates about 26 lives will be saved and 562 injuries prevented each year. Many times when we get involved in a case involving a tractor-trailer, we find that logs have not been kept as they should and their are multiple hours of service violations. If you have questions about an accident involving a tractor trailer, please contact Venus Poe today at 864-963-0310 click here to fill out an online case evaluation form. We handle case across South Carolina and have offices in Greenville, South Carolina and Fountain Inn, South Carolina to better serve you. There is no obligation or charge for our initial consultation to see if we can help you with your case. The information you obtain in this article is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should not read this article to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction in which you may have a case.

0 comments

Don't Wait to Get Help. Request a FREE Consultation!